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Final days in Bali

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My experience in Bali has become as unpredictable as the weather here. Despite my efforts to communicate with ROLE what I am looking for in a fellowship placement, the needs of the organization do not meet my own as the Insight Fellow. I have decided that in order to get the most out of my fellowship year, it’s best for me to reroute my time and focus for this placement. So now comes the true test of proactivity, a skill I am intent on perfecting this year.

So, I will be honest, the past two weeks have been met with a lot of difficulty and exhaustion. While I finished my time at ROLE just a few days ago, I have been stuck on thinking about what will come next. When I began to think about it I thought the most proactive thing I could do was leave Bali, make my time here a “mini placement,” and start anew somewhere else. After an eye-opening conversation with David, he suggested that maybe the most proactive thing I could do is stay and make it work on this island. My focus for the next week is “proactivity.” Whether it’s making it work here (or somewhere else), I have to figure it out quickly. This is a challenge I have never faced in my life, and, honestly, something I may never face again. I am excited, nervous, and ready. I am more than half way through my fellowship (I can’t believe that! Seeing it in print makes it so surreal!). This is the time for me to take what I have learned and taught, and use it to craft the most incredible experience for myself.

I have to mention that one year ago I was up late piecing together my proposal for my fellowship application. At the time it felt like it could never happen, but having a reason to organize my CV, put together a personal statement, and take a shot at an opportunity that wasn’t a “9 to 5” seemed like a great use of my time as a second semester senior. And it was! When I finally submitted my application in an attempt to keep my nerves at bay, I kept telling myself, “Well at least you did that.” And thank goodness I did! It took a lot of convincing in my own mind and from others to submit that application, I think mostly stemming from self-doubt. As things in Bali go somewhat astray, I don’t want to forget about that risk I took one year ago – the risk that causally changed my life.

Bali is slowly but surely stealing my heart. For myriad reasons it has been a difficult transition, but I am seeing that as an opportunity to revisit conversations I’ve had with David over the summer – what are my interests while I’m here? And what are the most creative ways I can meet those interests?

Currently I am living with three Australian entrepreneurs who have changed my perspective on what it means to move to a foreign country and build your business. I was struggling with how most entrepreneurs in Bali, due to generally low costs, come from all over the world come and take advantage of the beautiful little island. My roommates, however, had a different perspective. Having vacationed in Bali as children, they had fond memories of the people and culture. When they think about employing Balinese people they see it as positive development and treat it as such. That means participating in Balinese holidays and celebrations with their employees, getting to know their families, providing them training that will benefit them in the long run. However, like the employee-employer we see all over the world, there were still difficulties in communication on both sides.

At this point I’m feeling pretty confident in regards to relating the Influence and “negotiations content” with my day-to-day life. After some self-diagnosing I realized that I needed to reconnect with the content, and saw this as an opportunity to utilizing “Difficult Conversations” pieces. At day’s end I would listen to my roommates talk about the difficulties they were facing – who wasn’t showing up for work, who was giving customers a hard time, who was forgetting to place reorders. I discretely had conversations with them about blame vs contribution. (In difficult conversations we typically go straight to blame instead of looking at how we contributed to the problem. Once you diagnose your contribution it’s SO much easier to avoid reoccurring problems.)

I told David about how I am having these conversations, but we realized that for some reason I’m not crediting the source of the content. I am using it and sharing it, but I am not giving it a name, I’m sharing where it was coming from. So I’m meeting this interest of sharing the content, and meeting another in terms of utilizing difficult conversations content more, but next on my list is to channel my inner David and start saying things like, “Listen, this is actually the content I’m working with on my fellowship. I would be so excited to talk about this more directly and share more of the content I’m working with.” Sounds doable.

I am so excited that I had the opportunity to see a different part of Indonesia, and the opportunity came with the ability to teach at a university for two days. How amazing is that?

Representatives of the Law School at President University invited me to do a two-day training with 60 of their students and some of their faculty. The university is about 40 minutes outside Jakarta and was founded in 2001. After meeting the students and spending a wonderful evening with some of the faculty, I was eager to dive into teaching, yet there were challenges .  When I am running a workshop I have to actively remind myself to slow down, but this time it was my tendency to talk fast was compounded by a room full of students who know English as a second language, and who are at all different levels with understanding and using the language.

Last summer I worked with Stevenson Carlebach and David at a local training. I talked to Stevenson about modifying the work and the content for different audiences, and while I teaching at President University, I was actually faced with doing this “in the moment.” I was changing my agenda as the program was happening, I was thinking of new examples on the spot, and after finding that they responded very well to group work I began to integrate more of that into our time together. It was exhausting, but rewarding, because I could see that it was making a difference, and that right in front of me the students were picking up what I was putting down.

At the end of the program I was a total celebrity, everyone wanted my email, my Snapchat, and my Instagram. I thought back to David saying, “If you can influence and help one person this year, then you’ve done your job.” As I was saying goodbye to my students in the lobby of President University and couldn’t help but think, “Wow! I’m doing it.”

I am so excited that I had the opportunity to see a different part of Indonesia, and the opportunity came with the ability to teach at a university for two days. How amazing is that?

Representatives of the Law School at President University invited me to do a two-day training with 60 of their students and some of their faculty. The university is about 40 minutes outside Jakarta and was founded in 2001. After meeting the students and spending a wonderful evening with some of the faculty, I was eager to dive into teaching, yet there were challenges .  When I am running a workshop I have to actively remind myself to slow down, but this time it was my tendency to talk fast was compounded by a room full of students who know English as a second language, and who are at all different levels with understanding and using the language.

Last summer I worked with Stevenson Carlebach and David at a local training. I talked to Stevenson about modifying the work and the content for different audiences, and while I teaching at President University, I was actually faced with doing this “in the moment.” I was changing my agenda as the program was happening, I was thinking of new examples on the spot, and after finding that they responded very well to group work I began to integrate more of that into our time together. It was exhausting, but rewarding, because I could see that it was making a difference, and that right in front of me the students were picking up what I was putting down.

At the end of the program I was a total celebrity, everyone wanted my email, my Snapchat, and my Instagram. I thought back to David saying, “If you can influence and help one person this year, then you’ve done your job.” As I was saying goodbye to my students in the lobby of President University and couldn’t help but think, “Wow! I’m doing it.”